Rock Climbing CompanyAssociation of Mountaineering Instructors

Advanced Rope Work and Self Rescue Techniques

for Rock Climbing

 

Archidona climbing above the cave

 

Archidona crags above the cave

 

Climbing near Malaga

 

Archidona Upper crag

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced Rope Work and Rescue for Climbers

Multi Pitch belay systems

 

Rope work and self rescue skills can help you escape from problematic situations, but even more importantly give you the knowledge to minimise the chances of the incident happening in the first place

However accidents do happen and mistakes are made; when this occurs you will be glad to have the rope work and rescue skills necessary to solve the problems that arise.

How do you rescue your partner when you are on the second pitch of a route? Can you simultaneously abseil with an injured climber? Can you pass a knot through the belay system or abseil device?

This rope rescue course is aimed at climbers who wish to learn emergency rescue and rope work skills in a practical situation and it will aim to equip you with the ability to be more self-reliant when climbing on adventurous terrain. The instruction is given from a climber's perspective - offering practical solutions to real situations using just the gear you normally carry.

The training is carried out at a variety of local venues; featuring both single and multi-pitch climbs where you can practice a variety of self-rescue techniques.

This is an advanced course and to get the most from it you should be comfortable with basic rope work such as belaying and abseiling. The course normally lasts two days

.A full outline of the course is below together with an overview of our courses on the General Course Information page.

 

 

Advanced Rope Work and Self Rescue - Skills and Techniques

 

Hanging in spaceA working knowledge of rope work / self rescue techniques offers a double advantage; firstly you are less likely to get into difficult situations because you are aware of potential hazards and can arrange to minimise them; secondly , when they do occur you will often have the skills to stop the situation from escalating into a more serious situation.

The classic problems often involve stuck ropes, falling into space, ropes being too short to reach the ground and having to ascend ropes. Less common problems include rescuing injured partners who may or may not be unconscious.

This two-day course is suitable for all climbers who have basic rope work skills and want to gain the extra skill to become more competent, independent climbers. The course is applicable to all climbing disciplines; sport, adventure or group management - every recreational climber can benefit from this training

This rope rescue course is aimed at climbers who wish to learn emergency rescue and rope work skills in a practical situation and it will aim to equip you with the ability to be more self-reliant when climbing on adventurous terrain. The instruction is given from a climber's perspective - offering practical solutions to real situations using just the gear you normally carry.

We will usually cover the following topics :

  • Initially we will review basic rope handling skills as it is very important to build on your current skills.
  • Anticipating problems and preparing accordingly - avoidance is better than cure.
  • Stance management, rope work and equipment selection.
  • Situation analysis and rescue strategies - there are often several solutions to a problem, staying calm and thinking clear at this point will save time and effort later.
  • Knots & procedures - the key building blocks.
  • Escaping from the system - a key skill that gives you independence to perform more complex rescues.
  • Use of prussics and other ascenders - choosing the best prussic knot for the job on hand and the advantages/disadvantages of various mechanical ascenders.
  • Hauling and Pulleys - constructing efficient pulley systems
  • Crag evacuation - Hoisting, lowering and abseiling
  • Rescues involving leaders and traverses - complex scenarios that are not quite so intimidating once the core skills are in place

This course normally lasts two days and aimed at climbers who wish to learn emergency rescue and rope work skills in a practical situation. The best ratio for instruction is 2 clients per instructor, although it is quite feasible to run it on a one to one basis.

However as normal dates, venues and duration of the courses are by arrangement and totally customisable. Please do not hesitate to get in touch to discuss your requirements.

 

 

Self Rescue - Useful Information

 

1. Always keep things simple. When accidents happen it is easy to lose some clarity and feel pressured to take action quickly - simple techniques that have been engrained through regular use will be most effective in resolving the situation.

2. Always carry a pair of prussics - you won't have to use them often, but when they are needed they are invaluable. Sling your chalk bag on 5mm or 6mm accessory cord of a length long enough to form a prussic - that way there is always a spare for the team.

3. Know your prussics. The standard prusic knot has been pretty much superceded by the Klemheist prusic now because it can be released under load. The French prusic is also commonly used by climbers and can also be released under load, although it does have a tendency to lose shape/release a bit too easily. Too many turns on the prussic can be a real pain - normally 4 loops works well, but this depends on the diameters/condition of ropes + prussics being used.

 

 

 

The Strength of

Old Climbing Equipment

Broken Quickdraw Sling and Carabiner

I am often asked about climbing equipment - what equipment people should buy, should people buy second hand equipment, does minor damage affect equipment etc.

DMM recently received an old quickdraw from a customer who wanted to know how strong their old quickdraw would be.

The quickdraw consisted of 2 DMM Lynx carabiners - one plain gate and one bent gate that the customer said was about 20 years old plus a Petzl quickdraw sling that was also difficult to age.

The plain gate carabiner (1) generally seemed to be in reasonable condition with the key exception of the latch end of the gate. The end of the gate had suffered from salt corrosion at some point in its life and now was visibly corroded and the metal was exfoliating slightly,

The second image show this in more detail - roll the mouse over the image for even more detail. This was considered serious damage as this part of the gate holds the rivet that locates into the latch in the nose and is structurally very important.

The bent gate carabiner was in quite good condition with very little visible damage and no visible corrosion.

Carabiner showing exfoliation corrosionThe sling was slightly faded and had some abrasion damage at the end that held the plain gate carabiner. The fibres around the abrasion were quite fluffy, but there was no obvious cutting of the fibres. Again this is a bad place to have damage because quickdraws virtually always break at the apex where the load is applied

Initially we tensile tested the complete quickdraw using the standard carabiner test.

The first item to break was the sling (2) - this broke at the low figure of 9.23kN. It broke as expected at the apex with the abrasion damage - the 'slight fluffing' has cause a strength decrease of almost 60%.

We then pulled the individual carabiners.

The plain gate with corrosion damage (1) broke as expected at the gate as the rivet pulled free from the corroded gate. This carabiner broke at 12.55kN - when new it was rated 24kN, thus it had been substantially weakened, but was still suprisingly strong considering the extent of the corrosion.

The last carabiner was reassuringly strong and made a massive 27.90kN - cruising past its rating of 24kN more than 20 years after it was first made.

The morale is "visible damage relates to actual weakness - especially with fabric items".

Tensile Tester Reading 1Tensile Tester Reading 2

 

 

 

Prices

 

Type of Course
Length
Number of People on the Course
Cost of the Course per Group

Cost of the Course per person

Advanced Ropework and Rescue Course in Spain
1 Day Climbing Course
1:1
190 Euros
190 Euros
1:2
220 Euros
110 Euros
1:3
255 Euros
85 Euros
1:4
340 Euros
85 Euros
2 Day Climbing Course
1:1
380 Euros
380 Euros
1:2
440 Euros
220 Euros
1:3
510 Euros
170 Euros
1: 4
680 Euros
170 Euros
3 Day Climbing Course
1:1
570 Euros
570 Euros
1:2
660 Euros
330 Euros
1:3
765 Euros
255 Euros
1: 4
1020 Euros
255 Euros
4 Day Climbing Course
1:1
760 Euros
760 Euros
1:2
880 Euros
440 Euros
1:3
1020 Euros
340 Euros

 

Equipment provided by Rock Climbing Company: We will provide all technical equipment for this climbing course including ropes, climbing equipment, a variety of pulleys, prussics and jumars. We can also provide a helmet and harness for each client, but it is likeky that you will have your own harness - if not then this course is likely to be too advanced.

We will concentrate on using kit that you are likely to be carrying so prussics and a small pulley/DMM Revolver are likely to be useful - we can supply them, but they are items you should be looking to have on your rack so you get used to your own systems.

What you need to provide: You will need to provide suitable warm clothing for the time of year, bearing in mind that although we are in Spain some of the crags are quite high and out of the sun can become chilly; a light waterproof and walking boots/supportive training shoes for the approaches.

Ideally you will need your own rock shoes as well, although we can arrange hire rock shoes if required. You will also need a rucksack (30 - 40 litre capacity) and food and drink for the day.

What is not included: Prices do not include accommodation, meals or personal insurance.

We can provide accommodation in a newly renovated house with options from 10 Euros pppn - full details are in the Spanish Accommodation section.

Ratios and course sizes: Advanced Rope Work is best taught at a ratio of between 1 to 4 clients to 1 instructor.

Prices: A list of all prices are found below: All prices include VAT.

 

The full terms and conditions are on the booking page

Please do not hesitate to contact us for more information

 

 

 

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